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At the Time of the Tollund Man

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At the time of the Tollund Man

Video At the Time of the Tollund Man
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Video Introduction to the Iron Age
From "People of the Iron Age"
2.25 minutes - Broadband.
© Lejre Experimental Centre

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 Home At the Time of the Tollund Man

At the Time of the Tollund Man

What was the Tollund Man's Life like? - Early Iron Age

Click for extra large picture
In the Iron Age they used a plough called an "ard". Extra large picture. More illustrations. © Niels Bach
The Tollund Man was alive during the Iron Age
The Tollund Man was alive during the Iron Age.
Big picture © Lejre Experimental Centre
The Iron Age lasted from approximately 500 B.C. until 800 A.D. The name "Iron Age" is connected with the fact that after the end of the Bronze Age a method for extracting iron was discovered.

The Tollund Man was alive during the first part of the Iron Age. The Iron Age has been subdivided and given names according to the tribes which had the biggest influence on the different time periods.

The time of the Tollund Man, the first part of the Iron Age, is called Celtic Iron Age or pre-Roman Iron Age.

The Celtic Iron Age lasted from approximately 500 B.C. till the birth of Christ. The time period was named after the Celts who lived in Central Europe - mainly in the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Southern Germany, Switzerland, Northern Italy, France and England.

During times of unrest it was necessary to be on your guard
During times of unrest it was necessary to be
on your guard.
Big picture © Lejre Experimental Centre
The time period from 1 A.D. till approximately 400 A.D. is called Roman Iron Age after the Romans who had conquered most of Europe, right from the countries surrounding the Mediterranean to the Rhine in Northern Germany.

The following time period is the Teutonic Iron Age from approximately 400 till 800 A.D.

Teutons lived in Germany and Northern Europe, and after the fall of the Roman Empire they were the dominating power in Northern Europe.

A village similar to the ones from the time of the Tollund Man
A village similar to the ones from the
time of the Tollund Man. Big picture
© Lejre Experimental Centre
A significant number of excavations have shown that most of Jutland was populated during the early Iron Age.

The houses were rectangular, they were placed with one end facing east and the other facing west and were as long as 20 metres - they had mud-and-wattled walls and the roof was covered with straw or heather. In some cases the houses were placed far from other houses, in other cases they were placed close to each other, thus forming regular villages.

A house was typically divided into two halves - one half was a stable where the livestock were kept in stalls - the other half was where the family resided.

The fireplace was the centre of most of the indoor activities. The women would cook the food at the fireplace which also provided the room with heat and along the walls were sleeping places.

Clothes and fashion played an important role in the Iron Age
Clothes and fashion played an
important role in the Iron Age, too. Big picture
© Lejre Experimental Centre
As the discovery of the Tollund Man shows, the people of the Iron Age didn't look that different from the people of today.

Clothes and fashion played an important role in people's lives during the Iron Age, too.

Everday life in the Iron Age was marked by activities. Clothes and fashion played an important role in the Iron Age. They probably started the day by feeding the livestock. Everybody had to help out and they must have been tired at sunset after which they would sit around the fireplace and listen to stories before falling asleep.

In the basements of the iron-age houses we have discovered supplies of harvested grain, and from studies on the Tollund Man's last meal we know that during the Iron Age people ate a special kind of gruel or porridge made of barley, rye and oat. However, people did eat other kinds of food, too.

At the time of the Tollund Man people used a special plough called an ard to plough the fields
At the time of the Tollund Man people used
a special plough called an ard to plough the
fields. Big picture © Lejre Experimental Centre
When cultivating the fields the iron-age farmer used an ard - a special kind of plough which was pulled by oxen. He had cows, sheep, goats, pigs and horses, and the dog was his trusted companion.

People worshipped gods, but we don't know for sure exactly what gods they worshipped. People would make sacrifices to the gods in the bogs in order to stay on good terms with them.

Usually the sacrifices were earthenware vessels containing food, but also livestock or parts of one of the livestock was sacrificed. Maybe they carried out special celebrations and rituals in honour of the gods. Sometimes they sacrificed humans which the discovery of the Tollund Man shows.

Livestock was sacrificed, too
Livestock was sacrificed, too.
Big picture © Lejre Experimental Centre
When somebody died in the Iron Age, the body was cremated in a funeral pyre, the ashes and the bones were placed in an urn and buried. However, this is not what happened to the Tollund Man or the other bog bodies which have been discovered. It is a strong indication that they were sacrifices to the gods.

During the early Iron Age a significant number of wars took place in Europe, and violence and war were also part of people's lives in Denmark. We have discovered numerous weapons and armaments, which have been sacrificed in the bogs after regular battles.

Research shows that the climate was more wet and the average temperature was noticeably lower than the one of today.

Click for extra large picture
Was the Tollund Man a well respected man and
maybe the father of a family? Extra large picture.
More illustrations. © Niels Bach
Click for extra large picture
Or was he a captured enemy, thrall or criminal?
Extra large picture. More illustrations. © Niels Bach
 Related Stories
At the time of the Tollund Man

Everyday life
People got up when the sun rose and the cock crowed...

A village
Traces of the villages people lived in at the time of the Tollund Man have been found all over Denmark...

Houses
The houses were of the three-aisled kind which means that the roof was carried by two rows of poles...

Food
The cooking was done by the fireplace in the iron-age house...

Clothes and fashion
The clothes worn by Huldremose Woman consisted of a fur cape made out of sheepskin and a skirt woven with natural-coloured wool...

The iron of the Iron Age
Danish iron comes in the form of bog iron...

Gods and religion
When somebody died in the village, he or she was cremated in a funeral pyre....

Weaponry and war
During the early Iron Age a significant number of wars were on in Europe...

Transportation
During the Bronze Age light carriages with spoke wheels were developed....

The rest of the world
Europe was populated by two large nations who lived north of the Alps...

 
  More Info
When did the Tollund Man die?
The carbon-14 dating method has been used several times...



 On the Web
Internet The iron-age village
Internet Iron Age
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Internet The Iron Age
From Denmark.dk.

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